Martin Valentine – LIGHTSPACE.LONDON 2017
Add to Calendar   15/11/2017 09:00 AM 16/11/2017 05:00 PM Europe/London Lightspace.London 2016 ExCel London DD/MM/YYYY
15 - 16 NOVEMBER 2017 | ExCel, London

Martin Valentine

Ligman Lighting

Martin Valentine has recently been appointed Global Design Director at Ligman Lighting and has worked in the field of specialist lighting design for over 25-years. A Masters graduate from the Bartlett School of Architecture he has worked within the client, independent design practice, multidisciplinary consultant and now lighting manufacturer sides. At Ligman Martin’s role has a strong focus on the European, Asian, Australasian, Middle Eastern and North American markets. His work encompasses standards, quality, technology, training and events, defining R&D for future interior and exterior product ranges and interfacing with the international lighting design community and clients.

Previously, as Lighting Expert for Abu Dhabi City Municipality, Martin’s work included publishing award-winning new public lighting design standards and best practice, leading the implementation of an Emirate-wide Sustainable Lighting Strategy and overseeing the lighting design on the Municipality’s mega-projects. He is also Head of the Advisory Board & Course Directorat The Lighting Institute. TLI has recently launched in the Middle East offering lighting education courses as well as establishing the first Association, Community and Voice representing quality lighting and quality lighting design for the region.

  • Wednesday 15 November
    • 14:00

      Designers and manufacturers: Best of frenemies?

      James Poore of JPLD, Jonathan Rush of Hoare Lea Lighting, Martin Valentine of Ligman Lighting, Nick Hoggett dpa lighting consultants, Stuart Knox of Led Linear, Ulysse Dormoy of Atrium
      Our panel of three lighting designers and three manufacturers explore the space between suppliers and specifiers. Ideally it’s a symbiotic relationship where the emphasis is on win-win for all, including the client. But is it always like this in the real world, where cost pressures are all too real?